City of San Juan Bautista

City of San Juan Bautista

 

 

   
  AROUND THE MISSION GREEN
(1) Castro Breen Adobe – Purchased by the Breen family in 1848 and furnished in between the 1840’s & 1870’s style.
(2) Plaza Hotel – Built in 1858 by Angelo Zanetta and was a thriving hotel during the 1800’s.
(3) Settlers Cabin w/Gardens – A typical cabin housing early California settlers.
(4) Mission San Juan Bautista – Founded in 1797 is the 15th and largest Church in the Mission chain.
(5) Indian Burial Grounds – Over 4300 Mutsun Indians are buried in this cemetery next to the Mission Church.
(6) Plaza Hall – Acquired by Angelo Zanetta in 1868 for use as his private residence.
(7) Plaza Stable – Build about 1870 to handle the extensive stage and wagon traffic flowing thru San Juan Bautista.
(8) Town Galabozo (jail) – Built approximately 1880.

FROM 2ND TO 3RD VIA FRANKLIN
(9) Old Indian Village – On this site in early 1800’s the Mission housed Christian Indians in adobe buildings. When these adobes were abandoned in 1834, they proved a source of ready-made bricks for the first adobe residence along 3rd & 4th streets.
(10) Felipe Gardella House – c. 1860. Moved here from Polk Street. Gardella was a San Juan merchant in the 1850’s. (private)
(11) Jasper Twitchell House – c. 1860. A wheelwright and blacksmith, he developed the first commercial limestone kiln in San Juan Canyon. (private)
(12) The Old Brewery – c. 1870. Operated by Jake Beuttler 1870 to 1900; some of its beer was shipped to the San Joaquin Valley. (private)

FROM FRANKLIN TO WASHINGTON VIA 3RD
(13) Juan de Anza Adobe – Spanish style, one of four adobes still standing in the commercial area, all built after the Mission lands were secularized. Francisco Bravo, who built it, operated a cantina here during the 1850’s.
(14) Gardens to Juan de Anza Adobe
(15) Bravo House – Built in 1858 similar to Italianate style as the Plaza Hall and used as a private residence by the Bravo family.
(16) Theophile Vache Adobe – This once two-story adobe on the south corner of 3rd and Washington was, in the early 1850’s, a store in which the wines from Cienega Vineyards were sold.
(17) Tuccoletta Hall – Across Washington Street, this adobe, altered in the 1850’s, first operated as a tavern, then as Adophe Vache’s bakery until the 1880’s. It then became the merchandise store of the Lavagnino family for the next 50 years.

FROM 3RD TO 4TH VIA WASHINGTON
(18) Lavagnino House – Build after 1906 earthquake. So thoroughly scared, Mrs. Lavagnino refused to spend another night in their quarters over the store in Tuccoletta Hall. (Queen Ann Style)

FROM WASHINGTON TO MARIPOSA VIA 4TH
(19) One of only four remaining adobes left in town. Originally owned by Basque Rafael Pico. Purchased by Native Daughters in 1934, restored in 1935 and is their active local Parlor.

FROM 4TH TO 3RD VIA MARIPOSA
(20) John Anderson House – 1895. The closest thing in San Juan to a true Victorian building.
(21) Present frame buildings on SE corner of 3rd and Mariposa date from 1897. The 1895 fire destroyed a two-story adobe here.

FROM MARIPOSA TO POLK VIA 3RD
(22) On the north side of 3rd this corner building dates from 1850’s. Remodeled many times in was originally an adobe structure.
(23) Next door was an old saloon “The Fly Trap” – date uncertain.
(24) Alexander Bowler Bakery – 1857. Bread for the Plaza Hotel was supplied from ovens here. Front of store altered in 1890’s.
(25) Several shop fronts dating from 1860’s, much altered.
(26) Number 318 – Frame building dates from 1860’s/70’s. Little is known about it. May have been the old Ten Pin Alley which stood here during the Civil War period.
(27) The Old Bank Building – On the south side of street and behind you. Built a year after the great 1867 fire destroyed the entire block, it became the location of San Juan’s first bank in 1907.
(28) Taix Block – This sandstone was built by Antoine Taix in 1908 (Romanesque Revival). 2nd story zinc plated for fire protection.
(29) Next to it stands the first sandstone in San Juan built in 1868 and was occupied by a store known as the Pearl of San Juan. Note the iron fire doors.
(30) The Galacoma Building – 1870. Large sandstone building with its second-story porch has served as a hotel and bar.
(31) Building on the corner of 3rd and Polk streets is San Juan’s first brick building (1861); survived the fire of 1867.

FROM 3RD TO 4TH VIA POLK
(32) Rozas House – Emelda Lugo Rozas resided here for more than 75 years. Built by Samit, a Chilean, in 1856. An example of early “post-adobe” or “board-on-end” construction without the use of stud walls. (Private)

FROM POLK TO MUCKELEMI VIA 4TH
(33) Safety Award presented to ideal Cement, the company which operated a plant and quarry in San Juan Canyon off and on from 1915 to 1973.
(34) Native Daughter’s Plaque commemorating the first raising of the American Flag in this area.

FROM 4TH TO 3RD STREETS VIA MUCKELEMI
(35) Honeymoon Cottage – First occupied in 1890 by newlyweds Ed Pearce, Sr. and his bride.
(36) Kemp House – 1860. Early attempt at Greek Revival architecture. Rooms were added at random over a 50-year period. (private)

FROM MUCKELEMI TO POLK VIA 3RD
(37) Glad Tidings Church – Formerly First Baptist Church, 1863. This example of Greek Revival was moved here from the cemetery in 1886. Front porch was enclosed in 1888.
(38) Joe Zbrankik Blacksmith Shop – Turn of the century.
(39) Bluebird Hotel – 1894. Built by the Bowie Brothers.
(40) Odd Fellows Hall – was the old schoolhouse (1868). Moved here from its 1st Street site in 1907.

FROM 3RD TO 2ND VIA POLK
(41) The Crane House – c. 1835. Shows obvious Cape Cod influence. (private)
(42) St. John’s Institute – An orphanage build in 1864. Razed after being severely damaged in the earthquake of 1890. The name represents one of the few times that “San Juan” was translated into English.

FROM POLK WESTWARD ALONG 2ND
(43) The Masonic Hall – 1868. Built by the members for the princely sum of $5,000. Cupola reminiscent of colonial days.
(44) The Jim Jack Cabin – Moved here temporarily from its site in the San Juan Valley. Plaque give history. Simple “board-on-end”.
(45) The Lovett House – 1856. Early frame house. Lovett once owned a San Francisco to Los Angeles stage line. (private)
(46) The Cole House – 1856. Early frame house. San Juan homes were never pretentious, rather tending toward cottages than great houses. (private)
(47) Luck Library property donated by Francesca Luck. Library dedicated in 1979. The Luck Museum is operated by San Juan Bautista Historical Society.
(48) If one continues SW on Monterey Street you come to the two-story, gable Pedro Maraentis House, 1874. (private)
(49) Monterey Street leads to the old cemetery.
 
 

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